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Incineration


Municipal solid waste in the furnace of a moving grate incinerator

Thermal treatment is a solution for treating nonrecyclable and nonreusable waste in an environmental and economical friendly way. Thermal treatment reduces the volume and mass of the waste and inerts the hazardous components, while at the same time generating thermal and/or electrical energy and minimizing pollutant emissions to air and water.

Waste Incineration, pyrolysis and gasification are the possible thermal treatment processes. In modern European waste management waste incineration plays the absolute dominant role. The processes result in residual products from the waste as well as products resulting from flue gas cleaning additives, which afterwards have to be deposited at a controlled site such as a landfill or a mine. After thermal treatment ferrous and non-ferrous metals can be recovered and recycled. Also the grate ash or slag can be recovered for building purposes. Nutrients and organic matter are destroyed and cannot be recovered after thermal treatment.

In the European Union, Directive 2000/76/EC on the Incineration of Waste regulates waste incineration facilities and sets the limits for emissions into the atmosphere and discharge limits into the water. The objective of the Directive is to prevent or reduce, as much as possible, the pollution caused by incineration or co-incineration of waste to the air, water and soil that may affect human health.

See Also


 
Incineration
Pyrolysis
Gasification
Co-Incineration
Flue Gas Cleaning
Waste-to-Energy (WtE) facility in Canton Lucerne

Professional articles about: incineration plants on their way to thermal treatment plants

Current Practices and Future Management Options of Medical Waste Management in Turkey
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2016)
Medical wastes constitute a larger portion of infectious wastes that are potentially dangerous since they contain pathogenic agents. While sustainable management of municipal solid waste, wastewater sludge and construction and demolition waste gain significant attention, medical waste has not attracted the same level of attention as other types of wastes, especially in developing countries. Therefore, medical waste management is still a critical issue in many countries due to ist potential environmental hazards and public health risks.

Solid Recovered Fuel – Optimization of Plants in the Polish Economic Reality
© Lehrstuhl für Abfallverwertungstechnik und Abfallwirtschaft der Montanuniversität Leoben (11/2016)
Waste management and district heating systems, especially in scope of smaller facilities, require a thorough modernization. In addition, the existing model of these systems, especially for small and medium-territorial units, is not able to meet new requirements of the EU policy in the field of resources and energy efficiency. It is therefore necessary to seek for the new model which quality will be closer to the requirements of the overall strategy of the European Commission, whose key elements includes the impact of the project on the social prosperity and the preservation of the principles of sustainable development.

Modelling of Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) Properties Based on Material Composition – Chloride Quality
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Producing solid recovered fuels (SRF) is a well-established route for recovering energy resources from municipal solid waste (household and/or commercial). Chloride content critically impacts the quality of SRF. It directly influences operation of thermal processes, having deleterious effects through the high temperature corrosion of the boilers and through demands placed on the flue gas treatment (FGT) system, which could impact emissions control. Whereas design and specification of process plant can mitigate the technical issues associated with the presence of chloride experienced during thermal treatment, processing such fuels is associated with increased capital, operating and maintenance costs. This, at best, restricts the uptake/use of SRF or increases the cost of its treatment towards achieving a reduced chloride content.

Resource Recovery from Waste Using the Input Flexibility of Waste Gasification Technology
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Nowadays, gasification of waste or biomass is becoming the great interest all over the world. Especially, gasification of municipal solid waste (MSW) has been well-researched in Japan. The development of MSW gasification technology was started in the 1970s in Japan because of oil crisis. Several technologies have been researched and developed. The Direct Melting System (DMS), which is the gasification and melting technology developed by Nippon Steel & Sumikin Engineering Co., Ltd., is one of the developed waste gasification technologies in this era. This technology was introduced for commercial use in Kamaishi City, Japan in 1979. As well as this waste technology, other gasification technologies have been developed for commercial use and installed.

CO2 Capture and Re-Use at a Waste Incinerator
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Recently a new innovative process developed by Procede Gas Treating B.V. has been commissioned at line 3 of the Twence plant, a Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plant located in the eastern part of the Netherlands. In this process the CO2, that usually is emitted to atmosphere, is in this new application, scrubbed from the flue gas and the obtained pure CO2 stream is used to produce a sodium bicarbonate slurry (SBC). Instead of the conventional SBC flue gas scrubbing process, where dry SBC particles are used, this SBC slurry will be injected to remove the acid components from the flue gas, before the gas is emitted to atmosphere. Due to the implementation of this process the carbon footprint of the Twence installation is reduced. The new SBC plant produces 8,000 tons of sodium bicarbonate annually and to produce this amount of SBC 2,000 ton per year CO2 is captured from the flue gas. The CO2 originates for about 50 percent from biomass.

Manufacturing of Solid Recovered Fuels (SRF) for Energy Recovery Processes
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
This contribution describes manufacturing processes and quality of three types of
Solid Recovered Fuels – i.e. SRF low quality, SRF medium quality and SRF premium
quality – that are used in energy recovery plants. In total, two case studies are reported.
First case study is about the external processing and confectioning of non-hazardous
household, industrial and commercial mixed wastes as well as the internal treatment
and homogenisation of various waste fractions at the incineration plant for production
of SRF low quality that is utilized in a Waste to Energy (WtE) stationary Fluidized Bed
Incinerator. In the second case study, production of SRF medium quality and SRF premium
quality that are used for substitution of primary fuels like coal and petrol coke
in the cement kiln is described. Finally, data on SRF quality of all three investigated
waste types will be summarized and discussed.

Measures to Implement an Advanced Waste Management System in the Czech Republic
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
The Czech Republic is now preparing the new complete revision of waste law.
The transformation of the waste management into the circular economy started through the legislative process in June 2016. Waste management plan of the Czech Republic for 2015 to 2024 clearly specifies waste strategy and priorities for the country. Thus, in the Act on waste the ban on landfilling of recyclable and recoverable waste in 2024, obligatory separate collection of main municipal waste streams including biowaste since 2015 and currently proposed increase of waste landfilling tax with strict recycling targets already in 2018 are only the first milestones leading to smarter waste future in the Czech Republic.

Brave New World – Selected Jurisdictional Pitfalls when Acting on International Waste-to-Energy Projects
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Over the last few years, Waste-to-Energy (WtE) projects became increasingly international. In times of low interest rates, solid infrastructure projects with their fix return rates are more and more attractive to project developers, international investors as well as EPC and O&M contractors. They attract financial and strategic investors which would otherwise not turn towards these rather long-term investments. Therefore, a continuously increasing number of international players from different jurisdictions is entering the global playing field.

Overview of the Pyrolysis and Gasification Processes for Thermal Disposal of Waste
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Thermal treatment of waste started in the 1870s in England with the first waste incineration plants and this technology was in short time adopted by many industrialised countries. Starting in the late 1970s waste incineration was blamed for emission of toxic compounds, in particular of dioxins, and public pressure initiated the decree of more and more stringent air emission standards in all countries which, again, induced significant improvement of the environmental performance of waste incineration.

Initial Operating Experience with the New Polish Waste-to-Energy Plants
© TK Verlag - Fachverlag für Kreislaufwirtschaft (9/2016)
Waste-to-Energy plants are an integral part of modern municipal Waste Management Systems. Today recycling and energy recovery from waste are the only methods of dealing with municipal waste. This is demonstrated by Waste Management Systems in countries such as Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark and Austria, where the municipal waste management is limited solely to recycling and energy recovery from waste. The currently discussed concept of the latest circular economy package can hardly change anything in this matter. Poland, as one of the leaders among the new EU member states (since 2004), has still a lot to do within the scope of recycling and waste-to-energy.

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BEST PRACTICE

Waste-to-Energy (WtE) facility

Renergia, a brand new Waste-to-Energy (WtE) facility opened in Canton Lucerne, shows that Waste-to-Energy can provide reliable heat for industries.

Category: Incineration / Waste-to-Energy plant
Executing firm: Renergia Zentralschweiz AG

MBT Ljubljana, Slovenia

In Slovenia arises one of the largest and most modern waste treatment plants in Europe.

Category: Recycling / MBT
Executing firm: STRABAG AG

Flue Gas Cleaning

The final unit of the incineration plant is one of the most important parts as it has the objective of cleaning the air pollutants produced.

Category: Incineration
Executing firm: ete.a - Ingenieurgesellschaft für Energie– und Umweltengineering & Beratung mbH

Batch Dry Fermentation

The biogas produced from the waste can be converted in a CHP to electrical and thermal energy or fed as processed bio-methane into the natural gas grid or used as fuel (CNG).

Category: Recycling / Fermentation
Executing firm: BEKON Energy Technologies Co. & KG

MBT Warsaw, Poland

The Bio-Dry™ system is a static, aerated and flexibly enclosed reactor for the biological drying of various solid waste matters containing some biodegradable contents.

Category: Recycling / MBT
Executing firm: Convaero GmbH

 
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